Sci-Fi Adventure in the Far Far Future

    "We go where the wind takes us, of course we operate mostly in vacuum!"
    Dr. Percival Caernarvon, Ship's Doctor, A.S.S. Bounty

    This document is intended as the definitive source for rules information, but does not teach players how to play the game. Players should first read the Traveller Customizable Card Game Rules Booklet 2.0 in its entirety and use this Rules Reference as needed while playing the game. The most current rules can be found in the Downloads and Support section of the Traveller CCG website

    The majority of this guide consists of the glossary, which provides an alphabetical listing of terms and situations a player might encounter during a game. This section should be the first destination for players who have a rules question.

    The latter part of this guide contains two appendices. The first appendix provides detailed timing diagrams that illustrate the structure of an entire game round, as well as a detailed explanation on how to handle each game step presented in those diagrams. The second provides a detailed anatomy of each cardtype.

    Background

    The Traveller Customizable Card Game is set in the Third Imperium, an interstellar empire of more than 10,000 member worlds thriving in the distant future. Each player assumes the role of a starship captain at the head of a modest vessel and a small, adventurous crew, in search of riches and adventure.

    Game Overview

    Traveller has been designed to accommodate between one to four players (“Captains”). Each captain requires a 20 card Adventure Deck, a 60 card Captain’s Deck, and a single Ship () card.

    Victory

    The objective of the game is to be the first captain to reach 20 Victory Points (). Captains must also avoid Bankruptcy, which occurs if a captain incurs an expense and is unable to pay for it. Bankruptcy results in defeat, even if the captain is ahead in when insolvent. If all opposing captains have been eliminated, the remaining captain is the winner.

    The Golden Rule and The Platinum Rules

    The Golden Rule

    Card text can override any game rule except the Platinum Rule. If any card’s text conflicts with the basic game rules, the card’s language prevails, but only to the minimum extent necessary to resolve the effect. When determining a conflict between a card that says it does something and another card that says something “cannot” occur, “cannot” prevails.

    The Platinum Rule

    Cards may never change ownership. Within the course of a game, control of a card may change, but the owner will always be the captain who brought the card to the game. When a captain is eliminated, all cards owned by the vanquished captain are removed from the game, even if they are controlled by, or attached to cards controlled by, another captain.


    Glossary

    The following is a list of terms, concepts, and rules used in the Traveller Customizable Card Game.

    Abandoning Contracts

    During the game, a captain may find it necessary to abandon a contract , at which point that player is required to pay the cost, modified by any abandonment penalty modifiers from attached complication . After the contract has been abandoned, if there are no remaining captains pursuing it, that contract is removed from play, and the slot controller immediately replaces it with a new contract . If the abandoned contract still has one or more remaining committed captains, it remains in play.

    Ability

    Any effect generated by card text on a permanent.

    Advanced Capability Tokens

    Advanced Capability tokens, indicated by two basic capabilities on the same token, may be spent in place of either of their component capabilities. So for instance, may be used as either or . Unless otherwise specified, advanced capabilities count, for all purposes, as both of the basic capabilities that makeup its components. Thus a counts as both a and a and would be affected by any card or effect that encompassed either capability.

    When advanced capabilities are used as a requirement that can ONLY be fulfilled by that advanced capability token.

    Adventure Deck

    An Adventure Deck is comprised only of adventure cards, which have red backs. Adventure cards are dual purpose, consisting of both a Contract () and a Complication (). are opportunities to gain . attach to and impede a Captain’s ability to complete the attached . When an adventure card enters play, it does so only as either a or a , and it will retain that type so long as it persists, and cannot change between and .

    The Adventure Deck and the Captain’s Deck have separate discard piles. Discard piles are public knowledge. Any captain may look at the contents of any discard pile.

    When an Adventure Deck has no cards remaining and an adventure card draw is required, shuffle the Adventure Deck’s discard pile to reform the Adventure Deck.

    You may not look through your Adventure Deck or your Captain’s Deck after play has begun unless a card so directs.

    When building a deck, a Adventure Deck must contain 20 adventure cards and a maximum of two (2) of any one adventure card.

    Attach

    In Traveller, some cards will “attach” or become “attached” to another card. Attach creates a special relationship between two cards, binding them together. Attaching cards enter play by joining with another card currently in play (the “foundation card”), and remain in play unless removed by some effect or upon the removal from play of the foundation card.

    While the removal of the foundation card from play will always cause any attached cards to leave play, the inverse is not true, and the attached cards can be removed from play without impacting the foundation.

    Attaching cards maintain distinct game states, and can be targeted, affected, , or and removed from play independently of the foundation card.

    Attribute

    An attribute is a value on a card with a specific in-game effect. Each card type has its own set of attributes, further described in the card anatomy section of the Play Guide.

    Bankruptcy

    A captain unable to meet an expense becomes Bankrupt. Because captains must meet expenses if able, as a practical matter, bankruptcy will only occur when there is a pending expense and no further cards in hand or in the Captain’s Deck are available to be expended.

    A bankrupted captain is removed from the game, and any cards owned by that captain are also removed, even if under the control of another captain. In a two-player game, bankruptcy results in a victory for the remaining captain, even if the solvent captain is behind in . If a captain becomes insolvent during a multi-player game, they are removed from play immediately, and the game resumes.

    Captain's Deck

    A Captain’s Deck is comprised of captain’s cards, which have blue backs. The six types of captain’s cards are: Connections (), Crew (), Gear (), Heroic Actions (), Events (), and Upgrades (). Unqualified references to cards, whether in these rules or in card text are always to be assumed to refer to captain’s cards. Similarly, unqualified references to “decks” or “discard pile” are assumed to refer to the Captain’s Deck and the captain’s discard pile, respectively.

    When a Captain’s Deck has no cards remaining, do not shuffle its discard pile to reform the Captain’s Deck.

    You may not look through your Adventure Deck or your Captain’s Deck after play has begun unless a card so directs.

    When building a deck, a Captain's Deck must contain 60 captain's cards and a maximum of three (3) of any one captain's card, unless specified differently on the card.

    Cancel

    An effect that cancels another effect prevents the second effect from occurring. Cancelling a card played still means the card is played, it just will not produce an effect. Cancelling an effect or a card played does not prevent costs from being paid.

    Cards

    Cards in Traveller are divided into several different types, each with their own attributes and uses. Each player will require one , a Captain’s Deck of sixty captain’s cards, and an Adventure Deck of twenty adventure cards. The represents both the captain and their vessel. Unlike other cards, a captain’s may never be removed from play until bankruptcy or upon the game’s ultimate conclusion.

    Card Slots

    Card slots constrain the number of certain card types that a captain may have in play.

    • and are limited by the slots provided by the captain’s .
    • may not have more than one attached of the same subtype.
    • Captains may not have more than one of the same subtype.
    • A may not have more attached than its slots.

    Connections

    represent friends, contacts and resources, potential partners forged on the mains. These cards tend to be more support-oriented, augmenting the captain’s position rather than providing direct effects. A captain may not control more than one of the same subtype.

    Contract Slots

    There are always four slots. Control of slots depends on the number of players in the game. Whenever a leaves play, the slot’s controller draws from their Adventure Deck and plays the card face up as a . They then draw another card and, without looking at it, attaches it to the face down as a .

    If the number of captains in the game changes, for instance due to bankruptcy, the remaining captains follow the rules applicable to the new number of current participants.

    Number of Captains*Contract Slots Controlled
    22
    31
    41

    *In a three-player game, each captain always controls one slot. The fourth slot is controlled by the captain with the lowest total . If multiple captains have earned the same , control passes to the captain with the highest Initiative (). If these are tied, determine controller randomly.

    Solo Play

    Follow the set up as per standard rules. However, in solo play, the captain controls all four slots, so they will place four , each with an attached, face down, . Because are the primary obstacle in solo play, the Adventure Phase has a number of important changes.

    Control vs. Ownership

    Control and Ownership are two different concepts in Traveller. Captains own all cards that are included in their decks at the start of the game, as well as their . Note that ownership as a game concept is not tied to ownership in a legal sense.

    By default, a captain controls all cards they bring into play. Control entitles a Captain to generate effects, trigger abilities, collect resource tokens, select variables and pay costs. During the course of a game, control of a card may change, but ownership may not.

    Cost

    Cost is an important concept in the Traveller Customizable Card Game. Playing a Captain’s Card requires paying the cost in Credits (), which is printed in the upper left hand corner, by expending cards for their (see Expenses, Expend and Expense Value (EV / )). A cost of Credits does not require the expenditure of .

    If a captain cannot pay all of the costs of playing a card, the captain cannot attempt to play it. Some effects in the game may modify the Credits cost to play a card or add a cost requirement other than Credits; in order for these effects to alter a cost, they must have already resolved before a captain attempts to play a card (or generate an effect, see below). Once costs are paid, they cannot be altered. All modifiers to costs are applied before determining final cost. Final Credit costs below become . Costs are not Queued.

    Additionally, many cards have abilities that require a cost before they may be generated. Besides Credits, generating an ability may require other costs, such as a card. A captain can only attempt to generate an effect the captain can pay all of the costs for. Costs for abilities on cards in play are indicated by text and icons immediately preceding a colon.

    Only the card’s controller may pay costs, and all costs must be met from cards under that captain’s control. When unspecified, a card refers to itself, so a cost to means the card generating the effect or a cost to jettison means jettison the card generating the effect.

    Unless subject to a specific restriction, an effect may be generated multiple times, provided the cost can be met for each specific instance.

    Counter

    Counters are generated by or used to track specific effects, but have no independent agency, effect or ability outside that granted by a specific card.

    Individual cards may assign names to counters. Whenever another card would add counters to a card that specifies a particular named counter, those additional counters have that name.

    Crew

    provide skills and abilities critical to completing and hindering opponents.

    Deck Construction

    Traveller is a customizable card game, which means players create their decks using the entire universe of available cards. It is this element of deck construction that gives card games like Traveller a continuing appeal. Players are able to exercise creativity when making decks, basing them around particular mechanics, themes or aesthetics.

    In order to play Traveller, each player must have exactly 1 ship card, an adventure deck of 20 adventure cards, and a captain’s deck of 60 captain’s cards. No adventure card may appear more than twice in any captain’s adventure deck, and no captain’s card may appear more than three times in any captain’s deck.

    Deck/Discard Pile

    In Traveller, each player has their own Adventure Deck and Captain’s Deck. Adventure Cards will only ever be present in an Adventure Deck and Captain’s Cards will only ever be present in a Captain’s Deck. Each deck has its own, separate discard pile. Discard piles are public knowledge. Any captain may look at the contents of any discard pile. A card will never go into a deck or discard pile of a player other than that of the owner of the card.

    Discard (card)

    The act of moving cards from hand to the discard pile. It does not include moving cards from the top of one’s deck to the discard pile to meet an expense (see Expend). It also does not include moving cards in play to the discard pile (see Jettison). Only captain’s cards can be discarded, as adventure cards are never part of a hand.

    Discard (token)

    Removing tokens from the Resource Pool.

    Disperse

    When an effect directs a player to disperse a card, the card is set aside and is no longer part of the game. When cards are dispersed as costs for effects, those cards are removed from play to the disperse region. For example: Disperse: Remove target complication until the end of the round. The card dispersing the complication would be removed from play to the dispersed region, while the complication would be removed from play to the dispersed region until the end of the round. Except for , any card type can be dispersed, including both adventure cards and captain’s cards. Cards that are removed from the game because the owning captain has been eliminated are not dispersed, and do not trigger any text that references disperse.

    Dispersed Region

    The dispersed region is an out-of-game location used to store dispersed cards. Any card in the dispersed region is no longer in the game, and isn’t subject to any effect unless that effect specifically indicates it affects dispersed cards.

    Effect

    An effect is any card text with in game consequences. Effects enter the queue (see Appendix I: Timing).

    Related: Timing

    Enemy Ship Complications

    Some complications may require the captain to defeat an enemy ship (). To resolve the complication , use the Piracy rules on page 18, with the acting captain entitled to select whether they will assume the role of attacker or defender. The player must inflict sufficient damage to destroy the enemy’s structure to resolve the complication ; however enemy ships do not repair structure , so it is possible to accumulate damage over several rounds. If any enemy ship attribute value is omitted, that value defaults to 0. Enemy ships do not target upgrades . Any damage they inflict are resolved as expenses.

    Events

    Whether a fortuitous twist of fate or a meticulously planned ace in the hole, are powerful, single use effects that can potentially change the course of an entire game. always play as , unless otherwise specified. are transient. After the resolves, move it to the discard pile.

    Exert (), and Exerted

    Ready and Exerted are two game states indicating a card’s availability for further use. Only cards currently in play may be or , and only a ready card may , while only an exerted card may . Exerted cards are rotated 90 degrees from their ready state. Exerted abilities may not be used until the card is . Exerted crew still supply their skill tokens during the Resource Phase.

    Expenses, Expend, and Expense Value (EV / )

    Captains will incur Expenses. An expense must be met by expending captain’s cards for Expense Value (). Once an expense has been incurred, a captain must attempt to meet it by expending cards from hand or off the top of their captain’s deck, in any combination the player may desire. Expended cards are moved to the discard pile. Captains may not fail to meet an expense, and if they incur an expense that cannot be met, they become Bankrupt.

    may not be split between multiple expenses. If a card provides 3, it cannot be used as 1 for one expense and 2 for a second expense. However, multiple cards can (and, if necessary, must) be expended to combine their values to meet a single expense.

    Gear

    allows captains to increase their effectiveness of their .

    Hand Size

    Each player has a hand of cards. By default, all captains have a maximum hand size of seven (7). Only captain’s cards are ever in your hand. Cards in hand must be concealed from other players. You may always look at your own cards in hand.

    You may not look through your Adventure Deck or your Captain’s Deck after play has begun unless a card so directs.

    Heroic Actions

    are special, single use actions available to with the requisite skill. Because they require a captain to have a in play, and that must have the specified skill. can require some set up to use effectively. However, their effects can be powerful, and typically have 2 , so even if they can’t be played, they can be expended efficiently.

    Jack-of-all-Trades

    Jack-of-all-Trades is slightly different from the other skills. It does not have a token of its own. Instead, a with Jack-of-all-Trades () at the trained (hex) level may collect any other trained skill token except Psionic ( ). Additionally, a with Jack-of-all-Trades may not select a token corresponding to another trained skill that possesses.

    A with Jack-of-all-Trades () at the expert (circle) level may collect any two trained skill tokens (subject to the above limitations), but the tokens must come from two different skills.

    Jack-of-all-Trades is a partial exception to the rule that tokens are generated automatically.

    During Stage 1 of the Resource Phase, the controlling captain must announce which tokens they wish to collect from any with Jack-of-all-Trades. A captain who neglects this requirement is forbidden from collecting tokens for the undeclared Jack-of-allTrades skill that phase.

    Keywords

    Keywords are abilities represented by a single term. Using keywords saves space and ensures that the same ability works the same way across multiple cards. Keywords are represented by bolded and underlined text.

    Armor (X)

    For each point of Armor, reduce inflicted from each source by one.

    Armor Penetration (X)

    For each point of Armor Penetration possessed by a wounding source, reduce the effectiveness of Armor by one.

    Cash

    When playing cards with this keyword, Captains may only expend cards from their hand to pay the card’s cost.

    Concealed (X)

    For each point of Concealed, increase the cost opposing captains must pay to target the concealed card by one.

    Countermeasure (trait )

    A Hardened source with this keyword ignores any Critical from a damaging source with the corresponding specified trait.

    Critical (X)

    For each point of Critical possessed by a damaging source, reduce the effectiveness of Hardened by one.

    Equity

    When playing cards with this keyword, Captains may only expend cards from the top of their deck to pay the card’s cost.

    Expendable (X )

    A card with this keyword may be jettisoned to provide its Expendable value towards a pending Credits cost.

    Hardened (X)

    For each point of Hardened, reduce inflicted from each source by one.

    Hindrance

    Hindrance appears almost exclusively on cards meant to be played attached to a card controlled by an opponent, for a deleterious effect. Hindrances have both the Integral and Trifling keywords. Additionally, with Hindrance may be played attached to a controlled by an opposing captain, and with Hindrance may be played attached to an opposing captain’s .

    Humaniti

    A with this keyword counts as Human. This keyword will only be found on with a other than Human, and such also remain non-Human. Humaniti therefore qualify as both Human and non-Human.

    Infamous

    While a card with this keyword is in play, its controlling captain is considered to have an additional token.

    Integral

    A card with Integral may not be moved, except to an out of play area, such as the hand, deck, dispersed region, or discard pile.

    Invulnerable (to x)

    Cards with Invulnerable cannot be affected by effects or cards of a specified type. Invulnerable will always be paired with a specific identifier describing the nature of the immunity. A card’s Invulnerability will never extend to abilities it itself generates.

    If a card is Invulnerable to an effect, that effect may not:

    Mechanical

    Mechanical may not have restored by crew abilities, or unless the effect specifically indicates it will restore to Mechanical .

    Reflec

    An Armor source with this keyword ignores any Armor Penetration from a wounding source with Laser.

    Replenish (X)

    For each point of Replenish, the effect’s controller moves a random card from their discard pile to the bottom of their deck. If instead the text states to “Replenish this card,” then rather than drawing a random card from the discard pile, the card with Replenish is moved to the bottom of the controller’s deck.

    Resilient

    A Resilient card restores missing or during Stage 4 of the Ready Phase at no cost.

    Restricted/Unrestricted

    Normally, a card with a given card title can only be included up to twice in an Adventure Deck or up to three times in a Captain’s Deck. When a card has Restricted (X), it can only be included X number of times or fewer in the relevant deck. So, Restricted(2) for a Captain’s Deck card means at most two copies of that card in the Captain’s Deck. An Unrestricted card may have any number of copies in a deck.

    Trifling

    Trifling cards do not count against any limit restricting the number of cards a captain may have in play, and do not take up any slots. However, it still won’t permit a captain to control multiple with the same name.

    Jettison

    Jettison by default is the mechanism by which permanent cards in play are sent to the discard pile. In other words, any time you move a permanent card from play to the discard, you are jettisoning it (unless some ability specifically provides otherwise, which I don't believe any currently do). Move the jettisoned card from play to the discard pile.
    are jettisoned when they have taken a number of equal to their wound capacity.
    are jettisoned when they have taken a number of equal to their structure capacity.

    Limited

    A limited effect may only be generated once each round. Limited is depicted with the icon .

    Linked Icons

    In Traveller, linked is a concept used when an effect is reliant on a card having multiple specific icons. An effect that references a requires both icons within the link for that effect to apply. The first icon in a will define the object, whether a card type or card attribute, such as a subplot . The second icon will be an attribute. Often this attribute, will be a requirement, skill, type, or subtype. For instance, the event 3PL states: "Remove from play target ", This reads as: "Remove from play target complication with a cargo attribute". may not link icons within a .

    Look

    Allows a captain to view a specified card (or cards) without revealing it (or them) to any other captain.

    Modifier

    Any effect that increases or decreases any value of any card in play. Values in Traveller may be subject to either positive or negative modification. Fractional values are rounded up. Modifiers apply their full effect, even if that would reduce a value to less than zero. However, any value less than zero after all modifications have been applied counts as zero.

    Move

    Alter the location of a card, between the play area, discard pile, deck, hand, or dispersed region.

    Native

    Native refers to values, icons, text and attributes physically printed on the card.

    Non-Human

    A as non-Human if their any other than Human.

    Permanents

    A permanent card has a persistent presence in the game play area, unless removed by an effect. , , , and are all permanents.

    Piracy

    Captains who committed to piracy during the Adventure Phase may resolve a piracy action by the following procedure:

    1. The acting captain targets a controlled by an opposing captain. The pirate is the “attacker,” the target the “defender.”
    2. The attacker inflicts damage equal to their Attack Value (), minus the defender’s Defense Value (). For each point of damage, the attacker assigns it either as inflicted on an attached to the defender, or as an expense the defender must meet.
    3. If the attacker inflicted damage (if their exceeded the defender’s ), the piracy action is successful. If the attacker did not inflict damage, the piracy action was unsuccessful.
    4. The defender now inflicts damage equal to their , minus the attacker’s . For each point of damage, the defender assigns it in an identical manner as step 2. The defender’s damage, or lack thereof, has no impact on whether or not the piracy action succeeds (step 3).
    5. The pirate become uncommitted.

    Damage and Incurred costs from Piracy actions happen at the same time.

    When procuring cards during the Procurement Phase, Captains must pay an additional for each token they possess.

    Ready ()

    Ready and Exerted are two game states indicating a card’s availability for further use. Only cards currently in play may be or , and only a ready card may , while only an exerted card may . Ready cards are placed vertically so the text can be easily read.

    Restore

    Remove from a or from an .

    When directed to search, a captain may select a card from the designated search location (typically either the captain’s or adventure decks or discard piles), reveal the selected card to all players, and then perform any further effects as may be pending.
    Searching requires the Captain to shuffle the searched deck.

    Ship Upgrades

    allow captains to customize their , increasing capabilities, improving defenses, or augmenting firepower.

    Skill Levels

    Skills come in two levels: Trained (hex) and Expert (circle). may only have a given skill at a single level. No may have a skill at both the trained (hex) and expert (circle) levels. with trained who gains expert (circle) just has the expert (circle). The expert (circle) level of a skill may always be used in place of the trained (hex). An expert (circle) skill token may be spent to meet a trained (hex) skill requirement or cost.

    Some effects may grant a a specific skill level, rather than increase or decrease by levels.

    Target

    Targeting is the act of identifying the specific subject or recipient of an effect. Targeting is an explicit concept. If an effect does not state the word “target,” that effect does not target. When targeting is required, captains must choose a legal target, if able. If an effect cannot find a legal target, the effect fails.

    Timing

    In customizable card games, timing is the framework that determines the order in which effects occur. Traveller uses a LIFO system, Last In, First Out. Effects are resolved in reverse order in which they are played. LIFO can sound counter-intuitive, but as a mechanic it allows players the opportunity to respond to changing circumstances.

    • The Queue

    • Whenever a card is played or an effect generated, it enters the queue. The queue is cleared by resolving effects in reverse order in which they were played. Once a queue has been formed, only cards and effects with may be added to the queue.

      Most queues will only have a single item, and resolve without any further issues. However, the queue becomes relevant when captains wish to respond to an effect or card play

    • Activated Effects

    • An activated effect is any effect that requires a cost to be payed or a card play to generate. All transient cards are activated effects. Permanents also have activated effects, in the form of abilities that require a cost.

      Activated effects always go on the queue.

    • Persistent Effects

    • An effect is persistent if it is generated by permanent cards from abilities that do not have a cost. Such effects are always active, unless subject to an unmet condition. Persistent effects do not enter the queue.

    • Priority

    • Priority identifies the captain with the initial opportunity to take an , generate an effect, or play a card. Generally, priority rests with the acting captain. During phase stages in which there is no acting captain (for instance, Stage 1 Ready Phase), if two or more captains wish to play a card or generate an effect, priority is assigned to the captain with the highest .

    • Phase Restrictions

    • Some effects may have certain limitations regarding the phase or phases in which they may be generated. These phase restrictions are displayed on the cards in blue outlined text. Any text below the phase restriction is subject to it.

    • Timing Indicator

    • Text or icons preceding a dash (-) in a card’s text box determines an effect’s timing. There are two principle timing indicators in Traveller:

      • : This icon indicates that the effect is an action. may only be generated by the acting captain.
      • : This icon indicates that the effect is a reaction. Unlike other effects, may be generated at any time, including while another effect is being resolved. Unless otherwise specified, all cards are playable as .

      If an effect is not subject to either a phase restriction or the timing indicator, then it may be generated at any time, provided no other effect is pending. Only effects with timing may be played while another effect is on the queue.

    Tonnage

    Some ship upgrades may contain a tonnage requirement, noted on the upgrade as Tonnage. Ships may not attach upgrades that require higher tonnage than the ship tonnage rating. NOTE: Calculating upgrade tonnage is not cumulative, meaning you can have as many upgrades as your ships slots will allow as long as each of them is equal to or lower than the ships tonnage rating.

    Token

    A token is a game play element with specified effects that do not depend on any other card, ability or effect. Common examples include Resource, Infamy () and tokens.

    Trait

    A trait is a special characteristic of a card that lacks an independent effect, but may be implicated by other effects that reference the trait. Traits are always represented with bolded italic text.

    Transient

    Transient cards have a temporary presence in the game play area, existing only long enough to resolve any effects they may generate, after which they are moved out of play (typically to the discard pile). and are transient card types.

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    Appendices

    Initial Setup

    To begin a game of Traveller, each captain must:

    • Place their ship play.
    • Shuffle their Captain’s Deck, then draw a hand of seven cards.
    • Shuffle their Adventure Deck, then draw a card from the deck and play it face up as a contract . Then draw another card and play it face down, without looking at it, attached to the contract as a complication . Repeat this step for each contract slot the captain controls. In a two-player game, each captain controls two contract slots.

    Round Sequence

    A game of Traveller proceeds through rounds. Within each round, play progresses through six phases.

    Ready Phase

    The Ready Phase provides captains with an opportunity to reset their positions and plan their strategy for the upcoming round. Play proceeds through the following stages:

    Stage 1: All captains simultaneously ready all exerted cards.

    Stage 2: All captains simultaneously resolve to hand size by discarding any cards in hand in excess of their hand size, which by default is seven, then discarding any number of unwanted cards in their hands. Then drawing cards from the Captain’s deck until they reach their hand size limit. or until no more cards remain in the captain’s deck, whichever happens first.

    Stage 3: Determine play order by comparing each captain’s initiative . The captain with the highest rating sets play order by choosing a first captain for the remainder of the round. If the initiative ratings are tied, determine the first captain randomly. When play occurs in “Initiative Order” it begins with the first captain, then proceeding clockwise. The “acting captain” is the player currently progressing through a stage.

    Stage 4: In initiative order, captains may restore wounds from crew and/or repair structure from upgrades , at a cost of per point. Captains may elect to recover some or all of the wounds or structure , at their discretion.

    Stage 5: In initiative order, captains may move gear between crew they control. No gear may be moved more than once per Ready Phase. Gear with Integral (remember, all Hindrances have Integral) may not be moved.

    Stage 6: Check for victory. If a captain has met their victory point threshold, which is 20 by default, they win the game. If multiple captains have exceeded their victory point threshold, the captain with the highest victory points wins. If there is a tie, then the captain with the highest initiative wins.

    Adventure Phase

    During the Adventure Phase, captains play complications on contracts and commit to an activity for the remainder of the round. Play proceeds through the following stages:

    Stage 1: In initiative order, captains draw an adventure card, look at it without revealing it to opponents, then attach it face down on any contract in play as a complication . Contracts may not have more attached complications than permitted by its complication slots. If a new complication would exceed that limit, the acting captain must choose and discard an already attached complication to make room for the new one.

    Stage 2: In initiative order, captains choose an activity to pursue from one of three options:

    • Uncommitted: An uncommitted captain does not pursue any activity. If the captain was committed to a contract at the start of the phase, they may choose this activity, but must abandon the contract by paying the abandonment penalty .
    • Pursue a contract : This activity allows the captain to commit to a contract . Any captain may pursue any contract , regardless of contract slot control. A captain committed to a contract may elect to pursue a different contract , which will require abandoning the previous contract , by paying the abandonment penalty. Captains may also continue pursuing a contrract they had previously committed to but had not yet resolved.
    • Any time a captain elects to pursue a new contract , they must cover the distance (). For a cost of , a ship covers distance equal to its jump . Multiple jumps may be required to cover the distance.
    • Pursue Piracy: Captains may declare as a pirate for a cost of . Any captain declaring as a pirate gains an ionfamy token. Captains may engage in piracy even if currently committed to a contract , but they must abandon the contract by paying the abandonment penalty .

    Stage 3: Check for victory. If a captain has met their victory point threshold, which is 20 by default, they win the game. If multiple captains have exceeded their victory point threshold, the captain with the highest victory point wins. If there is a tie, then the captain with the highest initiative wins.

    Solo Play Adventure Phase

    Because complications are the primary obstacle in solo play, the Adventure Phase has a number of important changes.

    Stage 1: The captain draws an adventure card and, without looking at it, plays it face down as a complication , using the following steps to determine the contract to which it should attach.

    • Attach it to the contract with the highest victory point unless that contract already has a number of attached complication equal to its complication slots, in which case, attach it to the contract with the next highest victory points .
    • If all contracts already have a number of attached complications equal to their complication slots, then attach it to the contract with the lowest victory points total, after choosing an already attached complication to move to the discard pile.

    Stage 2: The captain draws an adventure card and places it face up as a complication on a contract of their choosing.

    Stage 3: Choosing an Activity to Pursue, Because Piracy is not an option, captains must choose between pursing a contract or being uncommitted.

    Stage 4: Check for victory. If a captain has met their victory point threshold, which is 20 by default, they win the game.

    Procurement Phase

    In the Procurement Phase, captains have the opportunity to hire crew , equip gear , forge connections and install upgrades .

    Stage 1: In initiative order, captains put connections , crew , gear and upgrades into play (“procure”) from their hand by paying the card’s cost. When procuring cards during this phase, Captains must pay an additional for each infamy token they possess.

    Connections and crew are placed directly into play. Upgrades are attached to the procuring captain’s ship . Gear are attached to a crew controlled by the procuring captain. Gear or Upgrades with the Hindrance keyword may instead be played on a card controlled by an opposing captain.

    Some card types have certain limits that constrain the number that a captain may have in play.

    Card Limits*
    Connection()No more than one of each subtyle
    Crew()No more than the slots provided by the captain's . are unique. No captain may have more than one with the same name, but multiple captains may each have a copy of the same .
    Gear()No may have attached more than one of each subtype.
    Upgrade()No more than the subtype slots provided by the captain's

    Anytime a captain would control cards in excess of any limit, that captain must choose and jettison cards until within permissible amounts. Cards with the keyword Trifling do not count against slot limits. See the Trifling entry in the keyword glossary for more details.

    Stage 2: Check for victory. If a captain has met their victory point threshold, which is 20 by default, they win the game. If multiple captains have exceeded their victory point threshold, the captain with the highest victory points wins. If there is a tie, then the captain with the highest initiative wins.

    Action Phase

    During the Action Phase, captains have the opportunity to improve their position and hinder their opponents.

    Stage 1: Captains alternate in initiative order performing actions. Actions are denoted by . Some gear may provide Use actions, indicated by the use icon. Use is always an action , and it requires the crew acting to exert .

    Heroics are a special kind of action available to crew with the requisite skill. When declaring a crew is performing a heroic, the controlling captain must choose whether the acting crew is taking the trained or the expert action . A trained crew may only select the trained action . An expert crew may perform either action, but not both.

    The expert level of some heroic may say “as above,” with or without additional text. As above indicates that the trained level text is applied, subject to any other modifying language in the expert ability.

    Captains may play cards, use non-action abilities or generate effects even if they are not the current active captain. However, no card or ability may be played during an action unless that card or ability has reaction ().

    The active captain may pass, if so desired. If all captains pass in order, the phase ends. If one captain passes and another acts, any previously passing captain may act.

    Stage 2: Check for victory. If a captain has met their victory point threshold, which is 20 by default, they win the game. If multiple captains have exceeded their victory point threshold, the captain with the highest victory points wins. If there is a tie, then the captain with the highest initiative wins.

    Resource Phase

    In the Resource Phase, captains generate tokens for use in resolving contract and complications .

    Stage 1: In initiative order, captains collect all resource tokens to which they are entitled. In Traveller, there are two kinds of resource tokens: Capabilities and skills.

    • A captain’s ship generates one capability token for each capability icon it possesses.
    • Each crew controlled by the captain generates one skill token for each skill it possesses. Skills come in two levels, trained (hex) and expert (circle). A crew generates the skill token that corresponds to the level it possesses.

    Resource tokens from a captain’s ship and crew are generated automatically, and are collected into the captain’s Resource Pool without any further act by the captain. A captain need not remember to physically gather the tokens. A captain may voluntarily reject any token from entering their Resource Pool, but must do so explicitly. If any effect requires a captain to pay a cost or resolve an effect to collect a token, that captain must explicitly elect to pay the cost or resolve the effect.

    Stage 2: Check for victory. If a captain has met their victory point threshold, which is 20 by default, they win the game. If multiple captains have exceeded their victory point threshold, the captain with the highest victory points wins. If there is a tie, then the captain with the highest initiative wins.

    Resolution Phase

    The Resolution Phase is, in many ways, the culmination of a captain’s efforts. During this part of the round, players attempt to resolve contract and piracy, in the hopes of advancing towards victory.

    Stage 1: All captains simultaneously reveal all face down complications on a contract they are pursuing.

    Stage 2: Captains alternate in initiative order performing one of the following Resolution Phase actions:

    • A captain pursuing a contract with attached complication may attempt to resolve a complication .
    • A captain declared as a pirate may resolve a piracy attempt.
    • A captain may pass. Captains who pass may make no further selections during this stage. Note, this is different from the procedure during the Action Phase, where captains are allowed to act after passing if another captain has subsequently acted.

    Once all captains have passed, the stage ends. If a captain is pursuing a contract , and that contract has no attached complications at the time the captain passes, that captain is an “eligible” captain. If a captain is pursuing a contract , and that contract does have attached complication at the time the captain passes, that captain is “ineligible.”

    Complciation Resolution: Captains committed to contract may attempt to resolve any attached complication by the following procedure:

    1. Select an attached complication . All complications on pursued should already have been revealed, but if, for some reason, the complication has not been revealed, reveal it.
    2. Complication are resolved by meeting its requirements. Requirements displaying a Resource Token icon are resolved if the captain can discard the corresponding token from their Resource pool. Alternatively, some requirements obligate the captain to jettison cards or incur expenses. Finally, requirements that simply state a card type or attribute (such as a trait) but do not specify any other obligation (such as jettison, exert , etc) can be met if the captain controls the corresponding card or a card with the specified attribute.
    3. If a complication has multiple requirements, resolve each one individually. Complications are resolved only if all requirements are met.
    4. If the complciation is resolved, the acting captain may then attempt to resolve any subplots () on the complication by meeting its requirements. If a subplot has multiple requirements, resolve each one individually. Subplot are only resolved if all requirements are met. Some subplot may have elective requirements, in which case the acting captain must choose one to fulfill. If there are multiple subplot , the acting captain may attempt to resolve some, all, or none at their election. If a subplot is resolved, the acting captain claims the subplot award.
    5. If the is resolved, move it to its owner’s adventure discard pile. Unresolved remain attached.
    6. If the acting captain resolved the complication , they may make further selections later during the Resolution Phase. If the acting captain failed to resolve the complication , they are treated as though they had passed, and may make no further selections during the rest of the phase, and are counted ineligible.

    Passing: A committed captain may elect to pass, rather than attempt to resolve a complication or piracy. Captains who pass in the Resolution Phase may make no further selections for the remainder of the phase. If a captain passes while pursuing a contract , and that contract has no attached complication , they are “eligible.” If the captain passes while pursuing a complication , and that contract has one or more attached complications , the captain is “ineligible.”

    Once all captains have passed, the stage ends.

    Stage 3: In initiative order, eligible captains may attempt to resolve contract the they are pursuing.

    • Contracts are resolved by meeting its requirements. Requirements displaying a Resource Token icon are resolved if the captain can discard the corresponding token from their Resource pool. Alternatively, some requirements obligate the captain to jettison cards or incur expenses. Finally, requirements that simply state a card type or attribute (such as a trait) but do not specify any other obligation (such as jettison, exert , etc) can be met if the captain controls the corresponding card or a card with the specified attribute.
    • If a contract has multiple requirements, resolve each one individually. Contracts are resolved only if all requirements are met. If the contract has been resolved, the acting captain claims the contract victory points.
    • If the contract is resolved, the acting captain may then attempt to resolve any subplot on the contract by meeting its requirements. If a subplot has multiple requirements, resolve each one individually. Subplots are only resolved if all requirements are met. Some subplots may have elective requirements, in which case the acting captain must choose one to fulfill. If there are multiple subplots , the acting captain may attempt to resolve some, all, or none at their election. If a subplot is resolved, the acting captain claims the subplot award.
    • If the contract is resolved, move it to its owner’s adventure discard pile. Then, the owner of the contract slot draws an adventure card and plays it, face up, as a contract . They then draw another adventure card and, without looking at it, attaches it face down on the new contract as a complication . If the contract was not resolved, it remains in play.
    • If the contract was resolved, the acting captain becomes uncommitted. If the contract was not resolved, the acting captain remains committed to it.

    Stage 4: Any captain who did not conduct a piracy action during the round loses 1 infmay token. Even if a captain declared as a pirate during the Adventure Phase, they will still lose an infamy token if they did not actually conduct a piracy action at any point during the round.

    Stage 5: All captains discard any remaining tokens in their Resource Pool.

    Stage 6: Check for victory. If a captain has met their victory point threshold, which is 20 by default, they win the game. If multiple captains have exceeded their victory point threshold, the captain with the highest victory points wins. If there is a tie, then the captain with the highest initiative wins.

    After Stage 6 of the Resolution Phase, the round ends. If nobody has won, begin a new round by repeating the phases, and continue the sequence until a victor has been determined.

    Piracy: Captains who committed to piracy during the Adventure Phase may resolve a piracy action by the following procedure:

    1. The acting captain targets a ship controlled by an opposing captain. The pirate is the “attacker,” the target the “defender.”
    2. The attacker inflicts damage equal to their Attack Value (), minus the defender’s Defense Value (). For each point of damage, the attacker assigns it either as structure inflicted on an upgrade attached to the defender, or as an expense the defender must meet.
    3. If the attacker inflicted damage (if their attack value exceeded the defender’s defense value ), the piracy action is successful. If the attacker did not inflict damage, the piracy action was unsuccessful.
    4. The defender now inflicts damage equal to their attack value , minus the attacker’s defense value . For each point of damage, the defender assigns it in an identical manner as step 2. The defender’s damage, or lack thereof, has no impact on whether or not the piracy action succeeds (step 3).
    5. The pirate becomes uncommitted.
    6. Damage and Incurred costs from Piracy actions happen at the same time.

    Actions in the Resolution Phase

    Some cards may be played as an action an during the Resolution Phase. A captain may play such an action instead of conducting piracy or resolving a complication .

    Note, however, that a captain who plays an action may resolve a complciation or conduct piracy when they next become the acting captain.

    Because uncommitted captains may not resolve complications or conduct piracy, as a practical matter their only available selections as the active captain are either a Resolution Phase action, or passing.

    Multiple Captains attempting the Same Contract

    Competition If multiple captains are pursuing the same contract , and they each complete it, each captain gains 1 less victory point . Then each captain pursuing the contract may attempt any subplots . The subplots victory points are not reduced, even if both captains can complete the subplot .

    Return to the Ready Phase